There’s a moment in Myst where you find a bolt of Black Ships fabric in Sirrus’ room on Stoneship, and I’ve always thought it would fun to redraw it at higher resolution… aaand make it a little fancier.  Why not.
The idea that Sirrus probably sews his own clothes is just…  It’s just great.  What a fuckin’ dandy.

There’s a moment in Myst where you find a bolt of Black Ships fabric in Sirrus’ room on Stoneship, and I’ve always thought it would fun to redraw it at higher resolution… aaand make it a little fancier.  Why not.

The idea that Sirrus probably sews his own clothes is just…  It’s just great.  What a fuckin’ dandy.

My steampunk Sailor Uranus (that’s Admiral Tenoh, thankyouverymuch) for Moon Crisis: A Sailor Moon Tribute Show down in Anaheim, CA!
I love the idea of doing customized/unique uniforms for each of the senshi, especially if it means I get to put Haruka in a more tailored/militaristic getup.  I have designs sitting around for the rest of the senshi, but… but let’s be honest.  I’m lucky I finished one design in time for this show. :P
-C

My steampunk Sailor Uranus (that’s Admiral Tenoh, thankyouverymuch) for Moon Crisis: A Sailor Moon Tribute Show down in Anaheim, CA!

I love the idea of doing customized/unique uniforms for each of the senshi, especially if it means I get to put Haruka in a more tailored/militaristic getup.  I have designs sitting around for the rest of the senshi, but… but let’s be honest.  I’m lucky I finished one design in time for this show. :P

-C

Took the time to take some shots of my finished piece for the How To Train Your Dragon show before shipping it off to Nucleus!  I was determined to do something with knots and interlace, so it seemed as good a chance as any to whip out Ye Olde wood burning tools.

…and a chance to take a photo of it surrounded by furs and tankards and horns because WHY THE HECK NOT

I promised Lissa that I would take some process photos of how I draw rocks, because it is widely known that LISSA TREIMAN CAN’T DRAW ROCKS apparently, and so here they are!  It’s no video tutorial, but it’s something. :)

So drawing rocks is kinda different from drawing other stuff.
What I love about drawing rocks is that they’re abstract, but they’re abstract with their own logic and history to them.  Rocks look the way the do for a reason- sediments, erosion, eruption, human foot traffic, what have you- and it’s important to suss out those reasons while you’re drawing them.  Sometimes you know why rocks look the way they do (maybe you are intimately familiar with the Colorado plateau, I don’t know your deal), but a lot of the time it’s up to you to silently observe trends and features in the rock that speak to a grander system.

Learning geology is gonna seriously boost your rock-drawing skills.
At Bryce Canyon (technically an amphitheater or pothole!), you’re staring at the Pink Cliffs of the Claron formation- limestone eroded into elaborate fins and hoodoos through an ongoing freeze/thaw cycle.  Unlike the formations in Arches, where you can see elaborate upheavals and folds, Bryce’s sedimentary layers are blessedly flat- you can trace the layers across multiple hoodoos, each of them wearing differently according to their particular mineral composition.  Knowing this, knowing what to look for when you’re drawing a particular formation, is a fantastic tool for you as an artist- as you’re laying in the overall shape, these tiered layers give you visual anchors to check the scale and proportions of the rocks.  Thanks a lot, NATURE.

How I personally draw rocks.
A note about hatching- I generally prefer directional hatching, rather than flatter cross-hatching, when I’m working with pen.  Cross-hatching happens in the process, it’s inevitable, but hatching in a direction consistent with the form you’re drawing tends to make for much more plausible 3D forms that sit well in space.  Look to Franklin Booth and Charles Dana Gibson for some particularly expert hatching inspiration.  Try not to cry.  So!  Onto the process itself:

  • I start out with loose outlines, marking particularly important landmarks, change of planar direction, and any deep pits in the rock- they help to anchor the drawing down the line, and give me a nice base to work on top of.  This is the stage when I panic and think the sketch is going to turn out horribly.  It is an ugly stage.
  • From there, I tend to (apparently, I don’t think this is something I’m considering at the time) block out sections of rock to render with more detail, working the entire surface and trying to keep broader value structures in mind.  Those darker pits in the rock help ground me- they give me a “darkest dark” that I can work against as I’m laying down tones.
  • As I start working on new sections of rock, I’ll jump back and forth to cohere the sections, make sure they sit well in the value structure, that the forms are reading across the rock, etc.
  • While you sketch, make sure you aren’t overworking the surface of the rock- let your eyes go out of focus, and really prioritize where to add value, where to leave swaths of blank paper, etc.
  • Once I’m nearing the end of the sketch, I’ll do a quick pass of overall hatching to make sure the piece reads as a whole.  I love the local colour of the hoodoos- the transitions from pink to orange to white- and so I wanted to make sure there was a hint of that broad value structure in my sketch.
  • Add plants, if available.  Plants make everything better.

And you’re done!  Or, well, you’re kinda cold and your butt’s going numb.  Here’s the final piece I ended up with, alongside an in-focus photo of the rocks for comparison:

…it’s not perfect- I can start to pick it apart now that I have them side by side- but it’s pretty damn close! :)

Have fun drawing rocks ALL DAY LONG,
-C

Oh, Elsa.  What are we going to do with you.

Frozen is purportedly set in the 1830’s-40’s, but I’ve been obsessed with finding a style that could marry her coronation gown with her ice gown more seamlessly; the open robes you see during the Regency era, including those being worn by Scandinavian royalty at the time, seemed a particularly apt analog for her… weird underarm-cape.  Thing.  You also see her mom wearing something very similar for something like ten years, so it’s not a huge stretch to think it could be a popular look in Arendelle.  THAT’S MY EXCUSE.

I initially designed this for her coronation, but I figured it wouldn’t hurt to explore how that same silhouette might work with her ice gown as well.  Someday, theoretically, I would love to do a more literally iced-up version of her gown, but I figured the alternate colour way would be a nice middle ground to strike.

-C

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kiikiibee

tophatandgoggles:

A while back I asked my talented friend Claire Hummel to provide reference regarding period specific clothing to help my art for my second book more authentic. As we head into con season perhaps this might help those of you planning your Victoria cosplay :)
Check out her da page here http://shoomlah.deviantart.com

omigosh I forgot I did this for Brian!  A special little behind the scenes treat for those of you who’re fans of Otto & Victoria. :)